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Posts Tagged ‘Seaside’

Oregon coast, Part 2

After we left Florence we went to Lincoln City where we enjoyed the scenery and a nice waterfall hike. And we had some of the best Dungeness crab we’ve ever had at the Casino. To make up for it, we had a longish (and muddy) hike on Cape Lookout.

From Lincoln City we went to Seaside where we stayed at a Thousand Trails park. The scenery around here is just fantastic, as is the hiking. And of course, a visit to Astoria included the Maritime Museum (very interesting!) and of course Bowpickers Fish and Chips.

We hiked in Canon Beach, but the trails were too muddy so we turned back. But again the scenery made it wort its while. We did get a view of Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, also known as Terrible Tilly because of the really bad weather in this area. It was decommissioned in 1957 and is now privately owned… and used as a columbarian (place to store cremated remains).

Since we had so much rain, we went to Fort Stevens where the main trails were paved, much easier to navigate. But Fort Stevens was fascinating, first built during the Civil War and used during WWI and WWII. It was fired on by a Japanese submarine in 1942, marking the only time US soil had a direct attack.

Drift Creek Falls

Drift Creek Falls

Suspension Bridge over Drift Creek Falls

Suspension Bridge over Drift Creek Falls

A bee hard at work

A bee hard at work

Looking SouthEast from Cape Lookout

Looking SouthEast from Cape Lookout

Looking NorthEast from Cape Lookout

Looking NorthEast from Cape Lookout

A little rough, a little muddy

A little rough, a little muddy


Surfing near Canon City

Surfing near Canon City

One of the batteries at Fort Stevens

One of the batteries at Fort Stevens

A view over the Fort Stevens bulkhead

A view over the Fort Stevens bulkhead

Part of Fort Stevens, built during the Civil War

Part of Fort Stevens, built during the Civil War

Standing by the Peter Iredale, shipwrecked in 1906

Standing by the Peter Iredale, shipwrecked in 1906

Very little left of the major cannery fire near Astoria

Very little left of the major cannery fire near Astoria

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, aka "Terrible Tilly"

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, aka “Terrible Tilly”

Posing near Canon Beach

Posing near Canon Beach

Surf rolling in near Canon Beach

Surf rolling in near Canon Beach

From the Acola Trail, near Canon beach

From the Acola Trail, near Canon beach

Haystack Rock, Canon Beach

Haystack Rock, Canon Beach

Seaside, OR area

September 8, 2011 1 comment

We spent a few days in Seaside, OR.  Seaside is both a tourist area (huge beaches) and a historical area (Lewis and Clark ended their expedition here).  So we visited some of the sites and explored the area.

Lewis and Clark did a monumental 2 year exploration trip from Missouri to what now is Seaside.  Along the way, they charted new territory for the United States.  Their contribution is remarkable.  Once they got here, they established Fort Clatsop, where they endured a miserable and cold winter.  They ran out of salt, necessary for meat curing (each expedition member ate 10 pounds of meat a day!).  They boiled down seawater to reclaim salt and eventually had enough to support their trip back east.  The fort was abandoned, later to be restored and is now a National Monument.

Shortly thereafter, John  Astor established the first fur trading outpost on the west coast here.  This eventually grew into Astoria, today a thriving city.  Huge ships are in the deep water harbor to transport lumber around the world.  It is also a cruise ship stop.  The now famous Astoria Coluimn depicts the rich history of this area, as well as providing sweeping views of the area.

A stunning sunset just south of Seaside

Astoria waterfront with historic cannery

The Astoria Column. 164 steps to the top (we counted).

Detail of the "sgrafitto" depicting the area history

Fort Clatsop reconstruction. In 1806, Lewis, Clark, and 24 men endured a very wet and cold winter here.

The 2.5 mile long Promenade along the ocean shore in Seaside. Today was foggy.

The salt works, where they extracted 300 pounds of salt from sea water

John and Romola, along with Lewis and Clark, at the spot where their journey ended.