Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Pearson Air Field’

Old cars at our museum

August 5, 2013 1 comment

There are two old cars at our museum, a 1932 Graham-Paige and a 1918 Stanley Steamer.  Both were taken out and driven for display at a local Concourse d’Elegance (old car show).  And, we got a ride in the Stanley Steamer!

It took well over an hour to get the Stanley up to steam.  Partly because of poor fuel; there is little kerosene available.  Also, the boiler is almost 100 years old, so it makes sense to bring up steam slowly.  Once going however, we felt that the Stanley was quiet, smooth and powerful.

Both cars in front of the Pearson hanger.  The Stanley is steaming

Both cars in front of the Pearson hanger. The Stanley is steaming

A good view of the Stanley Steamer

A good view of the Stanley Steamer

Detail of the boiler room

Detail of the boiler room

Now that is a real tilting steering wheel!

Now that is a real tilting steering wheel!

Lots of smoke!

Lots of smoke!

Pumping the starting fuel pump

Pumping the starting fuel pump

Checking to see if it ready yet

Checking to see if it ready yet

Almost ready....

Almost ready….

The condenser (radiator) is actually blowing steam rings

The condenser (radiator) is actually blowing steam rings

Finally, enough steam is showing to go for a ride

Finally, enough steam is showing to go for a ride

John in the Stanley

John in the Stanley

Looks like Romola is getting ready to drive off

Looks like Romola is getting ready to drive off

An overall view of the Graham-Paige touring car

An overall view of the Graham-Paige touring car

Port side view of the Graham Paige engine

Port side view of the Graham Paige engine

Driver side view of the Graham Paige engine

Driver side view of the Graham Paige engine

Closeup uf the Graham-Paige emblem

Closeup of the Graham-Paige emblem

Flying in a biplane

September 9, 2012 Leave a comment

A while back the Pearson Flight Museum had an open house.  There were lots of display aircraft, as well as flying ones.  But for us the excitement was in being able to get a ride in a 1929 biplane.  At first, Romola was a bit reluctant to go, but after it was over she agreed:  Fantastic!

There is something magical/historical to fly in an open cockpit plane, one with an original radial engine.  The experience… sound, vibration, wind… all add to the feeling.  Here are some images; the aircraft is a 1929 Travel Air E-4000.

Here comes our ride!

Tight fit in that cockpit, sure wouldn’t want to make a long flight!

On takeoff, you can see the Fort Vancouver site itself

Flying over the Port of Vancouver

Shipping on the river

A steep bank over one of the ships

Starting our “crop duster” pass

On the deck, below the tree top level, full speed!

That dike up ahead is looking rather large

Flying over Vancouver Lake, again below treetop level

Another tight bank at full speed over the Lake

There is Fort Vancouver, on the horizon

Making a Fort Vancouver pass. Runway visible.

Lining up on the runway

Back on the ground. That was such fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pearson Air Museum

Across the street from Fort Vancouver is Pearson Airport, one of the oldest operating air fields in the country.  In the late 1800’s, it was a base for flying blimps.  In 1905, the first fixed wing flights took off.  Among the “firsts” were the first airmail flight, as well as the first trans-polar flight (by the Russians, who landed here).

It was an important base during both WW1 and WW2.  In WW1, most of the wood for building aircrafts came from here.  In WW2, Kaiser Shipyards built over 500 ships, including aircraft carriers, on the river.

Now it is still operational but includes a nice museum.  It reflects on the importance of aviation to our society, and the importance of Pearson Field in particular.

A racer from the '30's

An AT6 Texan, later Harvard as a trainer

Painted red, this Fokker DR1 was the plane used by the Red Baron in WW1

A radial engine

A classy looking biplane

A look down the runway, Mt. Hood in the distance

Categories: Traveling Tags: