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Oregon Coast

August 1, 2019 Leave a comment

The last few weeks have been terrific to be on the Oregon Coast. Temperatures in the low 50 overnight and high 60 daytime, beats the Texas heat wave anytime! But all things come to an end and we are moving to Washington Sate and a cruise to Alaska. But before we go, a few pictures from the Florence, Seaside and Astoria areas of the Oregon Coast

Playing in sand

July 13, 2019 1 comment

Right next to our RV Park in Oregon are the Oregon Sand Dunes. One section is used for hill climbs, and all day long you hear the souped up motors rev up. Fortunately, they close the dunes at dark so we have quiet at night.

It is fun to watch them though, they really take this stuff seriously. And if you can’t afford a bike or a dune buggy, you can buy a ride in one. Fun!

Badlands, North Dakota

Theodore Roosevelt visited the Badlands as a 24 year old and was so impressed he is now considered one of the founders. Today, there is a National Park and the tourist city of Medora. We decided to spend an extra day here on our way West.

We had dinner at the Pitchfork Fondue, where they take a 12oz NY strip steak, put it on a pitchfork, and fondue it in hot oil. It is then served with all the trimmings, buffet style. We were impressed with the quality of the food, and the steak in particular. But we ate quick as it was cold and very windy.

We also bought tickets to the Medora Musical, a huge outdoor amphitheater where an evening’s entertainment of song, dance and comedy made for a pleasant evening, all in a magnificent setting. The setting sun in particular lent to an impressive performance.

We managed to get in a fair bit of hiking and walked some of the many trails in the Roosevelt National Park. The area certainly lives p to its reputation… the Dakota Badlands. Here are some pictures of our visit.

Mackinac Island, MI

August 19, 2018 Leave a comment

From Traverse City we drove up to St. Ignace, on the Upper Peninsula (UP).  We visited the famous Mackinac Island, a historical vacation area with some spectacular hotels and houses.  No cars are allowed on the Island, so everything is by foot, by bike, or horse drawn cart.  The gardens here are quite spectacular.  The ferry ride over took us under the bridge for a quite different view.

 

After our day on the Island, we drove to the northern part of Michigan where we found more dunes and nice hiking places.

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Traveling the MidWest

July 24, 2018 1 comment

For the past month and a half, we’ve been traveling in the MidWest (with stops in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana) with our friends of the Traveling Supremes Travel Club.  Since I am webmaster for the club, i posted a series of blogs of these travels.  The web site can be found by clicking here.

Because of the posts on that web site, I have not posted anything here for quite a while.  However, we are traveling on our own again, and have quite an ambitious schedule until we get back to Dallas in September.  This is to include Michigan, the UP, over to Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Mt. Rushmore.  So expect my posts to reappear here soon.

 

 

Tent Rocks National Monument

October 31, 2017 Leave a comment

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, located 40 miles southwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico is a (BLM) managed site that was established as a U.S. National Monument by President Bill Clinton in January 2001. Kasha-Katuwe means “white cliffs” in the Pueblo language Keresan.

The area owes its remarkable geology to layers of volcanic rock and ash deposited by  a volcanic explosion within the Jemez Volcanic Field that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago. Over time, weathering and erosion of these layers has created canyons and tent rocks. The tent rocks themselves are cones of soft pumice and tuff beneath harder caprocks, and vary in height from a few feet to 90 feet.

We hiked both trails, the one around the base and the much more difficult climb to the top.  The latter included both working our way through a slot canyon and scrambling over rock formations.  But the view from the was worth the effort.

Ancient peoples of the Southern USA

October 29, 2017 Leave a comment

While touring through Arizona and New Mexico, we had the privilege of visiting a few of the amazing sites of ancient peoples.  A few that stood out:

Montezuma Castle National Monument protects a set of well-preserved dwellings located in Camp Verde, Arizona which were built and used by the Sinagua people, a pre-Columbian culture closely related to the Hohokam and other indigenous peoples of the southwestern United States, between approximately 1100 and 1425 AD. The main structure comprises five stories and twenty rooms, and was built over the course of three centuries.

Tuzigoot National Monument preserves a 3-story pueblo ruin on the summit of a limestone and sandstone ridge just east of Clarkdale, Arizona, 120 feet above the Verde River floodplain. The Tuzigoot Site is an elongated complex of stone masonry rooms that were built along the spine of a natural outcrop in the Verde Valley. The central rooms stand higher than the others and they appear to have served public functions. The pueblo has 110 rooms.  The ruins at Tuzigoot incorporate very few doors; instead, they use trapdoor type openings in the roofs, and use ladders to enter each room.
At this site, remains of pithouses can be seen as well as petroglyphs, although the petroglyphs can only be viewed on certain days of the week.

Bandelier National Monument is located near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The monument preserves the homes and territory of the Ancestral Puebloans of a later era in the Southwest. Most of the pueblo structures date to two eras, dating between 1150 and 1600 AD.  Human presence in the area has been dated to over 10,000 years before present. Permanent settlements have been dated to 1150 CE. The distribution of basalt and obsidian artifacts from the area, along with other traded goods, rock markings, and construction techniques, indicate that its inhabitants were part of a regional trade network that included what is now Mexico.

During World War II the monument area was closed to the public for several years, since the lodge was being used to house personnel working on the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos to develop an atom bomb.